LIVEDATA

The Direct Marketing Association (DMA) estimates that £95 million is wasted every year mailing to businesses and people who are no longer there... STOP!

Aside from the staggering amount of money involved there are also professional issues at stake, if ignored these can irrevocably tarnish your company's image.

Imagine the distress caused to relatives by mailing to people who are now deceased, it is by far the most common complaint made to the Data Protection Registrar.

But it is not just bad manners, it is also bad for business. Human nature means that those directly affected will always tell significantly more people about their bad experiences than they ever do about their good ones.

If you are mailing to business your company will appear unprofessional mailing to people that have moved jobs. It is a waste of money and your chances of making a sale drop significantly.

Consider also the ever tightening legal requirements. Fines can run into the thousands for mailing, telephoning or faxing people who have registered their objections to such marketing approaches.

It is much cheaper to ensure these records are suppressed from relevant marketing activities than it is to market them. Not only is there a high chance your approach will annoy, your company's reputation will be damaged.

Why not take a moment to look through the various suppression tools we use to help ensure your campaign achieves the maximum results and the highest possible return on investment.

Deceased

Independent estimates suggests that, on average, around 170,000 mailings are delivered every day - all addressed to people who are now deceased.

It is by far the most common complaint made to the data protection registrar and it is impossible to quantify the emotional distress that this corporate carelessness can cause among surviving parties, relatives or friends.

For the recently bereaved, it adds insult to injury. For others, it can create active hostility at the sheer incompetence of a company that behaves in such a cavalier and insensitive manner.

These rogue mailings are therefore not just a waste of time and money - your company's reputation can really suffer too. 

MPS - The Mailing Preference Service

The Mailing Preference Service (MPS), set up in 1983, allows individuals to register to prevent them from receiving unsolicited mail through their letterbox.


The MPS is 95% effective against stopping unsolicited direct mail to consumers.

Who needs to comply with the regulations?


All those businesses who send direct marketing mail to anybody. both 'cold' lists and customer lists should be cleaned against the MPS before letters are sent, to ensure compliance with the regulations.

How often does the data need to be cleaned?


As frequently as is necessary to ensure that nobody protected by the regulations, who has registered within 28 days or more previously, is contacted.


The file contains over 600,000 individuals.

Goneaways

Experian are finding the number of people moving is increasing year on year and is currently nearly 10% of the current population.

 

What this means is that a customer or marketing database goes out of date just as fast. 

By using gone aways alone it is not accurate enough, as only 28% of the population have ever returned a piece of direct mail.

 

So, 72% of the gone away problem remains invisible, and even of that 28%, 30% are still living there. But along with the other cleaning tools used by us we can build up a fuller picture.

TPS - The Telephone Preference Service

As of 1st may 1999 the Telecommunications (data protection and privacy) (direct marketing) Regulations 1998 became law, which has an impact on every business, both large and small.

It is unlawful for someone in business (including charities and other voluntary organisations) to make a call to individuals (including sole traders, and (except in Scotland) partnerships) who have indicated they do not wish to receive direct marketing calls or have registered with the telephone preference service.

The act is very clear, before you make a call to any existing, or potential new customer, who has not given express permission to contact them, you should screen their telephone number against the Telephone Preference Service register (TPS). This must be done every 28 days.

 

 

Who needs to comply with the regulations?


In a nut shell, anyone who makes direct marketing telephone calls to individuals. Both 'cold' lists and customer lists should be cleaned against the Telephone Preference Service before calls are made.

 

How often does the data need to be cleaned?


As frequently as is necessary to ensure that nobody protected by the regulations, who has registered with either of the registers 28 days or more previously, is contacted. 

 

 

How many people are registered?


The file is added to daily with an average of 2,000 records the TPS file contains over 1.5 million telephone numbers.

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